Checkbox Cross Sell for Zen Cart Better Together

Zen Cart Checkbox Cross Sell allows your customers to add additional items (cross sells) to their cart when buying another item. It uses the configuration from Better Together to make suggestions from a list of items without attributes. It’s a great way to increase the value of each customer order.

Checkbox Cross Sell is the latest addition to the Better Together World for Zen Cart.

Updates to Zen Cart Better Together Checkout Candy

The Checkout Candy addition to Zen Cart Better Together has had a help update to show how to tweak the Checkout Candy display on the Shopping Cart page. You can

  • Reduce the total number of items shown
  • Reduce the number of items shown for each product (if a product is linked to many possible discounts).
  • Randomize the order of results

See Checkout Candy Installation Tweaks.

Mixed messages?

A wise man once advised  t-shirt vendors to use attractive female models, not the hoagie-loving dudes who actually wear the shirts.   This was a funny line, but is it truly good advice?   GrokDotCom’s Anthony Garcia says that seeing female models when he selected Men’s 2XL as his size  led to a confusing user experience.

“I would be interested to see what the bounce/exit rate would be on this page. I would bet a lot more than $50 that Threadless.com is bleeding guys on this listing page. I wonder how many guys are thinking they are in the wrong place.”

Perhaps a single size and gender appropriate model (even if CGI) followed by the usual community contributed photographs  would be a better compromise.

Decoy Marketing

I thought this was fascinating:

When creating their product offerings, most companies try to come up with the best and most attractive offers they can – a practice I wholly endorse. But, sometimes adding a less attractive offer to the mix will close more deals on the better offers without disadvantaging the customer in any way. So, next time you are coming up with your “good, better, and best” packages, consider tossing in a “not so good” package that’s similar to (but not as good as) the one you’d like to drive the most traffic to. If that boosts sales of that item, you’ll know your decoy is working!

Examples from the real estate space were given. I don’t think this means the tactic is more effective with larger more expensive purchases; I think it works across price points. Read the whole post here.